Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Help for a new player please!
#1
I played my very first game yesterday (the 'basic rules' only).  Some observations / questions:

2 The Board : Regarding the diagram, it is clear that the wind is blowing North to South.  So what is the black two directional arrow showing that is North East to South West?  I don't see why this black arrow is here, and if it's a major feature, I could be playing the game entirely wrong.

{Mario: You refer to the pictogram in chapter 2 of the rulebook.
...The black arrow was originally meant to indicate that this is the size of a hex equal to 1 cable.
But honestly I much more like Oliver's interpretation: This also well indicates how to place a ship within the hex. }



2 Status Sheet (5 Command Value) :  Just to confirm  - when calculating Command Value you DON'T add up the Captains Command Value on top too? It's a bit confusing seeing on the status sheet a command value, that you're not expected to use in calculating command values.  For example, the blanche opening CV should be 3.5 ONLY and NOT 5.5 (the SC + RC + Capt Faulknor CV)?  And then say the blanche loses one mast, and the Capt is still alive, the CV would be 2.5 and NOT 4.5? 

Also related to the point above, if CV of the SC drops to the bottom row, which is '0.5 damaged'.  I assume the CV still counts as 0.5 (there is no difference whether the ship is fully in tact, or on the bottom row)?  So, if the blanche has say, all sails in tact, 4 hits to SC (so is on the bottom row already), and the Capt. is still alive, that CV is still 3.5 (damaged means nothing for calculating the CV)?

{Oliver: yes, admirals' CV are taken into account when calculating CP.
With frigates, ship damage often has no or little impact on the amount of CV. Larger ships generate more CV when undamaged. They also have the status 'heavy damaged', which is used when testing for capitulation. Take a look at a status sheet for the Cape Henry scenario as an example. }


4.5 (Draw and initiative marker for single ship):  The wording of this section is ambiguous.  It's clear you start with the line highest to the wind, and left to right.  However, the example says start with a red, and then 'continue with the next single ship drawing another red, then yellow, then blue'.  Say you have 10 single ships, please confirm the order should be R R R Y Y Y Y B B B?  The way it's worded, you could equally imagine the order is R, R, Y, B.... And then I'm not sure what .  If I'm right with the first situation, I think the rules are clearer if it says instead, along the lines of,  'Draw the maximum number of red markers first, then draw the maximum number of yellow markers and for the remaining ships all draw blue markers'.

{Mario: I just copy my answer from another thread, because I thing it tells it all.}


{Mario: The ship with the better wind position should gain the benefit of the initiative. This is all what it is about.
So with two ships, the one closer to the wind (more up on the board) draws red, the other one yellow.
As you know, red tends to have higher numbers than yellow and yellow tends to have higher numbers than blue.

In the process of assigning Initiative Markers for Single Ships, you simply start with those, positioned the highest to the wind. If you have 5 ships, for example, you assign 2 red, 2 yellow and one blue marker. (Refer to chapter 4.5 in the rulebook)
The highest ship receives red, the second highest also receives red,
the next two ships receive yellow and the last ship, the most in LEE, receives blue. 
So far it's quite simple.

Only if two ships are really on the same hight, relatively to the wind, the rule doesn't function any longer.
We have a tie.
("on the same hight" means, they have both an equal distance from the long edge of the game board, or can both be found on a parallel line to the long edge of the game board.)

To fix this, only for the ships which are in a tie, located on this very line, you simply start to assign the colours from left to right.
(If you like, you might imagine, that for what ever reason, the ships on the left site are some yards higher to the wind than the ships on the right site.) }

 
4.6.8 Note :  It was not clear to me if you retain cards, that you still have to draw 3 or not, or just draw 'up to three'.  It was only when I saw the example in the Five Scenarios book was this clear, so it may need to be brought out more clearer in the rules.  Just a note to say 'even if cards are retained, the next turn the captain must still draw his full allowance of cards'.

{Mario: Yes, I agree. This is a good sentence to be used in the rulebook. Thanks.}

4.7.3. Test for Capitulation :  It is clear what 'dismasted' is (if all 3 of the masts have gone on the wooden ship).  But there appears to be no clear definition for 'heavy damaged' (i.e. can the blanche get heavy damaged?).  Can you please confirm how I know when something is 'heavy damaged'? This could perhaps be added as a glossary at the back?

{Mario: yes, "heavy damaged" only appears for larger ships, in larger scenarios.
The rule still is applicable for small scenarios, if a ship, e.g. a frigate, is dismasted.
However, for small scenarios, you might consider not to test for capitulation at all, if both players agree on that upfront.
In larger scenarios, this rule is much more important, because it simulates well crews who stops fighting, even if it would be important to fight on, from a strategical point of view. }



4.7.5  Pretty self explanatory, but there is no confirmation that if the End of Turn tracker says 'no' in the ship status sheet, no die roll is required as the game can not end then?  There is just no explanation for the 'no' situation that I can see.

{Mario: Yes, that's the way it was meant. }

Rare Events.  On turn two of my game the Captain was killed in a rare event! What happened was I rolled for the event to occur, and then I rolled again to check the result was 9 or more.  Was this the correct procedure for blanche? The reason I query this:  The person on board is a 'captain', is that captain also considered a 'commander'?  So, two ways I could see this playing out.  Either, upon the roll that the commander is killed, the captain should have been killed instantly? Or, upon the roll that the commander is killed, he does indeed need to take another check to roll a 9 or higher?  Which one is correct for the blanche?

{Mario: Yes, each separately marked person on the Status Sheet (with CVs, with a picture, ...) is called a Commander.
A Commander provides extra CVs for the ship he is located.
From the rank, he might be a Captain or an Admiral, much depending on the scenario.
In the squadron scenarios the highest ranked, not injured Commander, also provides the number of Admiral's Order Cards (and types) which can be played for all squadrons of a fleet.
For this it doesn't matter which ship he is located, as long as he is not injured.

Concerning the extra roll, as it is required by the text of the Rare Event Table:
This is simply to reduce the likelihood of a Commander being injured or killed.
But it also is a quite good indicator that something like the following scene happened on the quarterdeck:

While Victory was approaching the combined fleet at Trafalgar...
"... a shot struck the fore-brace-bits on the quarterdeck, and passed between Lord Nelson and Captain Hardy; a splinter from the bits bruising Captain Hardy's foot and tearing the buckle from hi shoe. They both stopped; and were observed by the Officers on deck to survey each other with inquiring looks, each supposing the other to be wounded. His Lordship then smiled, and said: 'This is too warm work, Hardy, to last long' and declared that through all the battles he had been in, he had never witnessed more cool courage than was displayed by the Victory's crew on this occasion."

In therms of Admiral's Order, this would have been a Rare Event, "Admiral Killed" with a second roll of an 8...
}


Moving: Can you deliberately use a card to turn into the wind? And without a card to get out of the wind, get stuck?  Therefore you can not use up all your movement points and your turn would end? Movement would be in the drifting phase then?

{Mario: Yes, you can. But it is dangerous. To test for drifting, a MC is drawn. If it shows "Leeway" the ship drifts one hex. If it shows "Bear Away" your opponent decides into which direction the "Bear Away" is performed. In other words, you lose control of your ship.}

In general, I found that for the starting position, the map was too tiny.  After only a few turns, one ship was sailing North off the map.  I tried to 're-set' the map, but there is no real advice in the rules on how to do this.  I treated the situation as though the ships were 'reappearing' on the bottom of the map.  But then, one ship sailed off the 'left' of the map, again needing a re-set, so it was a pretty frustrating break in play.  It's hard enough working out relative positions for two ships, so I'd be very worried in large battles (Trafalgar as an extreme, but single squadron scenarios typically) if you had to 're-set' the map constantly.   My only feedback in that respect would be, bigger maps needed possibly and more central starting positions in scenarios?  The only bit I was surprised about when I opened the box was you only get one map and the map seemed quite small.

{Oliver : In a situation when the action is getting too close to the edge of the map, I usually reposition all ships, keeping their relative positions; e.g. I move all ships X hexes to the south and then another Y hexes to the South-West. X and Y are of course constrained by how far ships are from each other. }


Overall, a good game and I am enjoying this so far.  I do think if you get through the entire rule set and expansions (moving, squadrons, close combat, sealed dispatches), you should get an Admiral's medal at the end and a certificate to say you are certified to become an Admiral in the Royal Navy. Smile   

All best !

Admiral Inwood
Reply
#2
Ahoy, let's see if I can answer at least some of your questions.

2 - The Board: I understand this as an illustration how ships are aligned within a hex, with the bow always pointing towards an edge, never a corner.

2 - Status sheets: yes, admirals' CV are taken into account when calculating CP.
With frigates, ship damage often has no or little impact on the amount of CV. Larger ships generate more CV when undamaged. They also have the status 'heavy damaged', which is used when testing for capitulation. Take a look at a status sheet for the Cape Henry scenario as an example.

4.3 - Initiative: I agree, it's confusing, and I don't know what is the correct way to assign the markers.

4.7.3: anwered above, I think

Movement: yes, that's how I understand it. You can turn your bow into the wind deliberately, which will stop your ship immediately and might have yu start drifting later.

In a situation when the action is getting too close to the edge of the map, I usually repostion all ships, keeping their relative positions; e.g. I move all ships X hexes to the south and then another Y hexes to the South-West. X and Y are of course constrained by how far ships are from each other.
Don't give up the ship!
Reply
#3
(20th Apr 2016, 21:21)okapelle Wrote: Ahoy, let's see if I can answer at least some of your questions.

2 - The Board: I understand this as an illustration how ships are aligned within a hex, with the bow always pointing towards an edge, never a corner.

2 - Status sheets: yes, admirals' CV are taken into account when calculating CP.
With frigates, ship damage often has no or little impact on the amount of CV. Larger ships generate more CV when undamaged. They also have the status 'heavy damaged', which is used when testing for capitulation. Take a look at a status sheet for the Cape Henry scenario as an example.

4.3 - Initiative: I agree, it's confusing, and I don't know what is the correct way to assign the markers.

4.7.3: anwered above, I think

Movement: yes, that's how I understand it. You can turn your bow into the wind deliberately, which will stop your ship immediately and might have yu start drifting later.

In a situation when the action is getting too close to the edge of the map, I usually repostion all ships, keeping their relative positions; e.g. I move all ships X hexes to the south and then another Y hexes to the South-West. X and Y are of course constrained by how far ships are from each other.

Thanks very much for these partial responses. I do think CV is then stated incorrectly in the manual? As in the section I refer to, it doesn't mention the Captains at all (from what I remember).

Glad it was not just me on initiative Smile   Will wait confirmation on this and all other points from Mario.  But, at least I can get playing a bit more now again.

Interesting facts on my second play....

I thought because the sea is just the sea it didn't really matter which way the board is. Turns out I was playing with the board upside down... I had the ships facing into the top left corner, instead of the centre.  That also meant I drew the initiative markers completely wrong. Now I realise my error after re-reading the example! At least I can be forgiven as a wannabe Midshipman!  Perhaps the map will work out better for me this play through!
Reply
#4
Thanks again for the questions and for the answers already given.

However there are some left and I will directly jump into the first text to answer them.
To have it all together I also copy Oliver's answers into the original text.

Alles Gute
   Mario
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)